Diagnostic Test to Aid in Determining a Patient's Menopausal Status

Published Online: Thursday, October 25th, 2018

Officials with the FDA have permitted marketing of Ansh Labs' PicoAMH Elisa diagnostic test, an aid in the determination of a patient’s menopausal status.

“Diagnostic results about a woman’s menopausal status may prompt discussions about preventative care for women experiencing menopausal symptoms,” said Courtney Lias, PhD, director of the Division of Chemistry and Toxicology Devices in the FDA’s Center for Devices and Radiological Health, in a prepared statement. “This test, when used in conjunction with other clinical assessments and laboratory findings, can help inform discussions about preventative care, such as ways to help prevent loss in bone mineral density or to address cardiovascular disease, both of which are known to increase after menopause.”

During the menopausal transition, the body's production of estrogen and progesterone, two hormones made by the ovaries, varies greatly. Bones become less dense, making women more vulnerable to fractures. During this period, lipid profiles may change including increases in low density lipoprotein (LDL), a type of cholesterol. After menopause, women enter post-menopause, when they are more vulnerable to heart disease and osteoporosis.

According to the FDA, it is important for women to understand their stage of menopausal transition to learn what, if any, additional health risks they may face and any preventative health steps to take.

The PicoAMH Elisa test measures the amount of Anti-Müllerian Hormone (AMH) in the blood. AMH levels represent one indicator available to clinicians to determine whether a woman is approaching or is likely to have reached her final menstrual period. The PicoAMH Elisa test is meant to be used only in conjunction with other clinical assessments and laboratory findings.

Data reviewed by the FDA showed that the PicoAMH Elisa test performed reasonably well at determining levels of AMH in the blood and identifying women who had their last menstrual period and women who were more than 5 years away from their last menstrual period. The data relied on 690 women, aged 42 to 62 years, who participated in the multi-center, longitudinal Study of Women's Health Across the Nation.

Clinicians should carefully evaluate PicoAMH Elisa test results in the context of a full clinical work up to ensure that contraceptives are not discontinued in women who have not yet reached menopause and that uterine bleeding due to endometrial cancer is not dismissed as a diagnosis, FDA officials said, in a press release. The PicoAMH Elisa test should not be used to assess a woman’s fertility status or to monitor or predict the ovarian response in women undergoing or planning to undergo fertility treatments.

The FDA reviewed data for the PicoAMH Elisa test through the de novo premarket review pathway, a regulatory pathway for low-to-moderate-risk devices of a new type. Along with this authorization, the FDA is establishing criteria, called special controls, which set forth the agency’s expectations in assuring the accuracy, clinical performance and labeling of tests intended to be used as an aid in the determination of a patient’s menopausal status. These special controls, when met along with general controls, provide a reasonable assurance of safety and effectiveness for these tests.


Reference

FDA permits marketing of a diagnostic test to aid in the determination of menopausal status [news release]. Silver Spring, MD; October 24, 2018: FDA website. https://www.fda.gov/NewsEvents/Newsroom/PressAnnouncements/ucm624284.htm. Accessed October 25, 2018.  



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