Many Patients With Asthma Using Their Inhalers Incorrectly

Jennifer Nessel, Assistant Editor
Published Online: Monday, February 25th, 2019
Many of those with asthma may be using their inhalers incorrectly, thereby increasing their risk of asthma attack, according to new research published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice.

Investigators at Propeller Health, in conjunction with the University of Colorado School of Medicine and Children's Hospital Colorado, gathered data from 7558 patients, and found that 84% of patients took less than 30 seconds between the first and the second puff of their rescue or controller inhaler. Furthermore, 67% waited less than 15 seconds between inhalations. Only 16% of patients waited more than 30 seconds between puffs, the minimum amount of time necessary to complete the recommended steps.

The recommended dosage of asthma medicines requires 2 'puffs' of the inhaler, and many patient instructions recommend that a patient exhale completely prior to inhaling, inhale the medication slowly and deeply, hold their breath for up to 10 seconds and then wait prior to their next inhalation. These several steps should take between 30 and 60 seconds, according to the authors.

Patients aged 4-11-years had the highest level of acceptable timing between inhaler use, while those aged 18-29 years had the lowest, according to the press release.

"We hope that with this data from digital medicines, patients and doctors will stimulate a renewed push to address known issues in inadequate inhaler technique, which we know can have a significant impact on how patients experience their disease," said Stanley Szefler, MD, director of the Pediatric Asthma Research Program in the Breathing Institute of the Pediatric Pulmonary and Sleep Medicine Section at Children's Hospital Colorado, in a prepared statement.


Reference 

84% of people with asthma may be using their inhalers incorrectly, Propeller Health study finds [news release]. Madison, Wisconsin; February 21, 2019: Propeller Health. https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/84-of-people-with-asthma-may-be-using-their-inhalers-incorrectly-propeller-health-study-finds-300799662.html. Accessed Feb. 21, 2019.




Current Issue

The Educated Patient

Katarzyna Lalicata, MSN, FNP-C, FNP-BC
The symptoms associated with colds, most commonly congestion, coughing, sneezing, and sore throats, are the body's response when a virus exerts its effects on the immune system. Cold symptoms peak at about 1 to 2 days and last 7 to 10 days but can last up to 3 weeks.
Kristen L. Marjama, DNP, APRN-BC, FNP
Exposure to damp and moly environments may also result in a variety of other health issues.
Bethany Rettberg, NPC
An accurate medical history and a physical exam are critical to rule out more serious conditions.
Bethany Rettberg, NPC
Practitioners should get a detailed medical history and conduct a thorough physical to treat sinus infections.
$vacMongoViewPlus$ $vAR$
Contemporary Clinic
MJH Associates
American Journal of Managed Care
Cure
MD Magazine
ONCLive
OTCGuide
Pharmacy Times
Specialty Pharmacy Times
Targeted Oncology
About Us
Advertise
Careers
Contact Us
Feedback
Privacy
Terms & Conditions
Pharmacy Healthcare & Communications, LLC
2 Clarke Drive
Suite 100
Cranbury, NJ 08512
P: 609-716-7777
F: 609-257-0701

Copyright Contemporary Clinic 2019
Pharmacy Healthcare & Communications, LLC. All Rights Reserved.